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Reflection on the “Mulligan Concept” Workshop

It is very important for all clinicians to reflect on things that we learn may it be by undertaking a course or what our patients teach us every day in the clinic. By reflection, I mean, analyzing what did I learn, what is good about this, how can I use this in my patients, how […]

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Writing “Discussion section” of an article

Discussion generally summarizes the main findings of the current research work and compares and contrasts with the previous work and finally explains the clinical implication of the current work with the limitations the current work had. Discussion section of a scientific paper can be compared with a closing argument during a legal case discussion in […]

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Make use of free Resources and handouts from APTA CSM conference

I always wanted to attend the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) combined section meeting (CSM) in the United States. This year, I am less upset about not being able to attend as APTA has put all the handouts of the conference talks in their website. The website has handouts for the topics such as: 1. […]

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How to write the “result section” of an article?

The result section of an article describes to the reader the outcome and finding of the research in a clear and concise manner. It is the reflection of the “method section”. It explains what the authors found from the research. The function of the result section is to objectively present the text result without interpretation. […]

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Classification of Low Back Pain based on Neuropathic, Nociceptive, or Central Sensitization dominance

Low back pain (LBP) is a heterogeneous disorder including patients with dominant nociceptive (e.g., myofascial LBP), neuropathic (e.g., lumbar radiculopathy), and central sensitization pain [1]. Nociceptive pain is defined as “pain arising from actual or threatening damage to non-neural tissue and is due to the activation of nociceptors, or as pain attributable to the activation […]

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Writing “Methods” section of an article

The method section of any article ideally ties “the introduction” to “the results” section to create a clear story line. It should present the obvious approach to answer the research questions and define the structure in which the result will be presented later. The method section of an article should allow readers to: • Understand […]

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Why does an old knee hurt?

Old knees are mostly painful due to a complex problem called the osteoarthritis (OA). It is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders, which refers to clinical syndrome of joint pain accompanied by varying degrees of functional limitation and reduced quality of life (1). It affects more than one-third of persons of age more than […]

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How can we measure pain?

The ultimate aim of any clinician is to relieve afflictions of the patient which is measured in terms of pain. Pain is a psychological phenomenon and naturally there are several facets central to its perception [6]. These include intensity, duration, interference with activities or disability, affect, tolerance, fear avoidance, catastropizing etc. There are multiple validated […]

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How to write “introduction section” of an article?

A “good introduction” makes up a “good article” Introduction is the most read section of an article. The quality of the introduction attracts the readers to further proceed to read the entire article. A good article will generate interest among the reader towards the research work. It is therefore critical part of an article, thus […]

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Mulligan’s Approach – Workshop Opportunity in Nepal

What is Mulligan’s concept? A concept of manual therapy where the therapist applies the accessory joint mobilizations with the patient generated physiological movement (MWM). Mostly, it is done in weight bearing position and helps to reduce the pain and symptoms instantly. This is the reason why the patients or those with painful disorders like the […]

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